Friday, August 9, 2013

GlamGlow Super-Mud™ Clearing Treatment Mask - Review, Pictures

GlamGlow Super-Mud Review on pinksith.com 
GlamGlow Super-Mud™ Clearing Treatment Mask, touted as a "Hollywood Favorite" of Stars like Jenifer Aniston and Miley Cyrus, is the latest over hyped mud mask to catch my attention. However, the obscene price tag of $69 USD for 1.2 ounces made me lose interest fast. It wasn't until I received a $100 Sephora gift card for my birthday this year that I finally broke down and purchased this "wundermask" for myself.

Here are the mistakes I made:
a) I didn't do my due diligence. I didn't research the ingredients as well as I should have.
b) I didn't read enough reviews of this mask and relied on the "glowing" reviews from the Sephora website
c) I applied it to my face thinking it would actually work.

What's that saying? Insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results. That's me when it comes to over the counter treatments for my wretched skin. I got sucked into the hype. I wanted to believe that this product worked, so I ignored the signs that this was simply overpriced slop.

Let me make a long story short. Purchased. Applied as directed for multiple treatments. NO improvement in quality, tone or texture of my skin at all. No decrease in acne. HUGE increase in irritated skin and additional breakouts. Returned to Sephora for a full refund. With the refunded money, bought lip gloss and eyeshadow to ease my suffering.

GlamGlow Super-Mud Review on pinksith.com

Normally I do not review products that I have returned. Even if I purchased it and hated it, I don't normally return because I feel like I owe you all an honest review. If I return something it's like I didn't "suffer enough" to review a crappy product. But this had to be an exception. I had to return it because it was utterly useless and almost destructive to my skin...but I had to review it because I didn't want anyone else to suffer from this product.

GlamGlow claims that this Super-Mud™ Clearing Treatment Mask is "A scientifically advanced SUPER-MUD™ clearing treatment to target, prevent, and heal problem skin. This formula was clinically developed by GLAMGLOW® dermatological chemists to help fight all common skin concerns, including breakouts, discoloration, black and white heads, razor bumps, and in-grown hair."

GlamGlow uses a slew of self coined scientific-y phrases that are trademarked ™ to make them appear legitimate. Phrases like TEAOXI™, Pore-Matrix™, ACNECIDIC-6™, and K17-Clay™ make the GlamGlow Super-Mud™ Clearing Treatment Mask sound very futuristic and science-y. But when you look at the actual ingredients and beyond the marketing jargon, you will see, like I did that this is just a bunch of smoke and mirrors.

GlamGlow Super-Mud Review on pinksith.com

TEAOXI™: It's just green tea extract and a mix of highly irritating plant extracts like eucalyptus, peppermint, comfrey, ivy, marigold, to name a few.

ACNECIDIC-6™ 4.4%: Claiming to be proprietary blend of AHA and BHA acids that is "perfectly PH balanced" is simply a slew of acids with the kitchen skin thrown in. Mandelic Acid, Glycolic Acid, Lactic Acid, Azelaic Acid, Pyruvic Acid, and Salicylic Acid. The PH balancing comes from Sodium Hydroxide which is essentially lye. It is a PH adjuster. Sadly the PH for the acids to be effective in exfoliation of the skin, needs to be at 5. The GlamGlow has a PH of 4.1, according to Paula's Choice Budepedia Review. For more information about skin PH check out this easy to read article from skincareRX.

Pore-Matrix™: Claiming its efficiency by "reveal[ing] dots of vacuum extractions" Oh man. Do they have a brass set or what? Those "dots" are not vacuum extractions. Those "dots" are little pools of oil getting sucked up by the very basic and extremely inexpensive Kaolin Clay ingredient. Seriously. ANY mask strong in Kaolin Clay will show those "dots". That is just oil. Which by the way, may actually be harming those with oily skin more than you think. When you apply clays along with irritating ingredients, like those plant extracts, to oily skin, it actually causes the skin to go into overdrive with the oil production. This means your skin will eventually become MORE oily and may cause breakouts or make the breakouts you have even worse.

GlamGlow Super-Mud Review on pinksith.com

Even if the ingredients in the GlamGlow Super-Mud™ Clearing Treatment Mask were as effective as the company insists that they are, they wouldn't be stable for very long in the jar packaging the company chose for their masks. Once that jar is open, and oxygen is introduced to the product as well as your unhygienic fingers or brush or spatula (It comes with a plastic spatula under the lid) those extracts are going to break down and become almost useless by the second or third time the jar is opened. Ridiculous!

The company counters the poor choice in packaging by adding in a bevy of harsh preservatives to counteract the possibility of introducing bacteria to the product since it is in a jar. In the Super-Mud™, there is almost every paraben ever invented.

Phenoxyethanol - Preservative
Ethylhexylglycerin - Preservative
Caprylyl Glycol - Preservative
Methylchloroisothiazolinone - Preservative and STRONG irritant
Methylisothiazolinone - Preservative and makes methylchloroisothiazolinone less irritating when combined in a product.

Do you NEED this? Not just no, but HELL NO! This is modern day snake oil at its finest. It did the exact opposite of "clearing" my skin. It costs an outrageous amount, the ingredients are ineffective in what they are supposed to do and have an opposite effect on the skin. I have had better results from the Ahava Time To Clear Purifying Face Mask for a fraction of the cost. And if you really, really want a mask with charcoal, try the Clear Improvement Charcoal Mask from Origins. (Affiliate link) It's way nicer to your face and way less money.

I'm considering changing my slogan from "Beauty, Cosmetics, Skin Care, Hair Care, Fragrance and Geek Stuff" to "Suffering through bogus product claims, so you don't have to...and geek stuff"

Ingredients: Water, Kaolin, Magnesium Aluminum Silicate, Sodium Hydroxide, Eucalyptus Globulus, Mandelic Acid, Charcoal, Parfum [Benzyl Benzoate, Linalool], Glycolic Acid, Lactic Acid, Azelaic Acid, Pyruvic Acid, Salicylic Acid, Xanthan Gum, Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Juice, Maltodextrin, Iron Oxides, Peppermint Oil, Butylene Glycol, Glycyrrhiza Glabra Root Extract, Glycerin, Chamoilla Recutita Flower Extract, Calendula Officinalis Flower Extract, Cucumis Sativus Fruit Extract, Hendera Helix Extract, Symphytum Officinale Leaf Extract, Phenoxyethanol, Ethylhexylglycerin, Caprylyl Glycol, Hexylene Glycol, Methylchloroisothiazolinone, Methylisothiazolinone.

20 comments:

  1. Thanks so much for that review! I almost bought that crap as well, now I'm very glad I didn't.

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  2. Thank you for posting this. I won't bother. Love your blog.

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  3. I stupidly decided to pick up their smaller trial size of the regular glam glow in line at sephora when on holiday in New York this summer. It broke me out worse than I can remember and it didn't clear until long after my two week holiday was over. Obviously I returned it and the staff at Sephora were not surprised by what I had experienced to say the least.. I know "its just skin" and I did have a wonderful time, but it did still ruin my holiday to some excent... having to spend every morning applying foundation and concealer when your about to spend the day in over 30 degrees celsius was quite uncomfortable as I'm usually a tinted moisturiser type of gal. It's great you wrote this review as there is very little about it on blogs, and I guess now we all know why.. xx

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  4. I got a sample of this from Sephora. It felt like my face was on fire and my skin was being sandblasted right off my face. Furthermore, once the vicious red finally faded, I found that, like you, there was absolutely no improvement in my skin. I thought it was just me since, frankly, I don't really need clarifying products (I tend to be normal/dry, not oily), but I'm oddly satisfied to find out you think it sucks as well.

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  5. GIRL! You are SINGING MY SONG! I thought the exact same thing, and I get a better result with the good old Queen Helene Mint Julep mask you can get at Sally for $3. This is expensive junk, and I wanted to love it so much. No such luck.

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  6. I'm glad to see a review like this - I've seen a number of raves and was looking to see if they made the $19 mini size of this (I was NOT going to commit to a full jar for that kind of money). Now I know I'm not missing anything and will happily stick with my much more affordable (and already face-tested and approved) Mario Badescu Flower and Tonic Mask.

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  7. Bought it after the raves - had it home and realized that I was suckered into it. Returned unopened. And now I'm happy since you convinced me that I was right.

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  8. It sucks that the product was such a let-down! I'm glad you were able to return it. And thanks for the mini ingredients lesson!

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  9. Ouch! This is really a bad, bad product - it's bad enough if it doesn't work, but is worse if it MAKES YOUR SKIN WORSE! OMG!

    That said, I have a small quibble with one sentence you wrote. I know I suck, you wrote an awesome possum review and totally suffered for our sakes and I'm quibbling. But here goes. Technically this product is "paraben-free", because although it uses preservatives, it doesn't use any perservatives that are parabens (e.g. methylparaben, propylparaben etc). I'm sure somewhere in the marketing you'll see them tooting their horn about this. But I do agree - some of these preservatives used are actually more irritating to the skin than parabens can be (and despite all the "OMG YOUR FACE CREAM CAUSES CANCER" thing with parabens, they're actually safe enough to be used to preserve food, and noone's complaining about parabens in food). It's one of my pet peeves - brands cave to a small but vocal minority of annoying science-ignorant customers, and phase out parabens, but in the process put in stuff like Methylchloroisothiazolinone and Methylisothiazolinone and other inferior replacements that not only do worse at curbing bacterial growth in the product, they also end up irritating the skin more.

    Okay, rant over. I agree the purpose of my quibble wasn't so much to nitpick on your sentence as it was for me to rant about how ignorant customers drive brands to inferior formulation. And I wouldn't have been able to without your awesome review :)

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  10. Wow, it is enough for a product to just suck and not do what it claims to do (like the damn Nanoblur I worked so hard to get my hands on and have been trying to make work for days now) but if a product actually makes your skin WORSE? Well that is really bad. Thanks for the honest review.

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  11. Thanks Pink Sith for the great review of this way over-hyped tub of muck! I happened to watch QVC last night on Friday Night Beauty and this was touted as being wonderful. Glad I didn't order it.
    I been using the Borghese mud mask for 15 years, and just want to try something new. Will look into your other recs.

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  12. Great review. Thanks for emphasizing the importance of due diligence. I tend to run any time I see capitalized, trademarked ingredients featured prominently in ads. Since none of them are ever peer reviewed, proprietary names like TEAOXI™, Pore-Matrix™, ACNECIDIC-6™ signal marketing mania overdrive. Shakespeare once wrote, "First, kill all the lawyers," (Macbeth?). I'd start by killing, or at least muzzling, all the marketers!

    moushka 26 (at) yahoo (dot) ca

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  13. I can totally relate to your experience with GlamGlow! I SO prefer the Origins Charcoal Detox to this because it works and doesn't cause the painful burning sensation that GlamGlow did. I returned it too-- thanks to Sephora's amazing return policy!

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  14. Well here's one I won't be buying anytime soon! I admit I was a little curious about all the hype but your review did it for me. I actually like clay masks but my staple remains an inexpensive French brand called Cattier easily available in Europe which has very simple ingredients.

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  15. I LOVE this product! I use it to spot treat blemishes and find it works really well! It shrinks them faster and a container lasts forever. I prefer the white container over the black Glam Glow.

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  16. WOW!! I am so, so, so, so, so, so glad I bought the $19 "trial" size @ Sephora. I used mine once and didn't have any reactions, but neither did I see any improvment. I think I'll stick with my Dr. Dennis Gross Alpha Beta Peel Pads.

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  17. I bought the trial size of the "black" jar, glad to know I wasn't the only one who didn't feel revolutionized by this mud masque. If you're looking for an amazing mask that also burns a little try the "exfolikate" one, the 105 (CAD) dollar one. But try a sample, because 100 bucks is insanity. I also remember this glam glow saying was used backstage-where? Backstage secret... to what? I doubt make up artists have time to give models much more than a quick cleanse and moisturize during a fashion show, they are BUSY

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  18. Thanx for the review .. I was about to buy it but my brain told me to search more before jumpping into the hype.

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